The liveliest, the most distinguished, and the most eclectic of all the quarterlies published today.— John Hall Wheelock

Spilt Ink

Spilt Ink No. 11: Marlin Barton

"My great-great grandfather, Ralph Barton (often called Rafe), who was born in 1840, had three families. They ran concurrently."

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Spilt Ink No. 10: Graham Barnhart

"I have to admit that military work is also a necessary gathering of tinder. It’s the fuel for all the tiny flames of inspiration that burn like votive candles in a roadside shrine, little prayers that might turn into poetry."

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Spilt Ink No. 9: Merritt Moseley

"The Internet is to not writing what Crompton’s Mule was to spinning, multiplying one’s (in)efficiency immeasurably. How did we manage to get so little done back before the World Wide Web?"

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Spilt Ink No. 8: Margot Demopoulos

"The unconscious is trying to say something. We may just lose our way and waste time. Or we may not lose our way so much as find it."

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Spilt Ink No. 7: Kent Nelson

"Landscapes can be used to good effect for the mood of a story — not simply in creating a storm as an ominous mood, but in using drought, barrenness or richness of trees, and other elements as part of the fabric of a story."

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Spilt Ink No. 6: Casey Clabough

The story of a trip to Sewanee with George Garrett — involving seedy motels and “breaking a fall for American literature.”

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Spilt Ink No. 5: Kathryn Starbuck

"I slapped him on the face and he shut up, just like in the movies."

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Spilt Ink No. 4: Kathleen Witkowska Tarr

"In the world of arts and letters, particularly among spiritual writers and thinkers, Thomas Merton was a lead guitarist, a solo sax player, a star trumpeter, the man everyone wanted to come and listen to."

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Spilt Ink No. 3: Cary Holladay

"My own experiences in those rural landscapes influenced the new work, as did the passage of time, which was working its changes on farming, social customs, and memory itself."

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Spilt Ink No. 2: Michael Beeman

Check it out! For the first time in the history of the Sewanee Review, we're delivering a series of never-before-published essays exclusively online. Read the second entry, Michael Beeman's "From Inspiration to Print," which follows the inaugural and eponymous essay of the series, Brock Adams's "Spilt Ink."

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Spilt Ink No. 1: Brock Adams

"Here’s the thing: I don’t really like to write."

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An Interview with Barry Sternlieb

New contributor Barry Sternlieb talks poems, presses, and different perspectives

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An Interview with Jeffrey N. Johnson

Talking with our new contributor and Andrew Nelson Lytle Fiction Prize Winner.

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An Interview with Phillip Parotti

"Allenby was magnificent that day, outmaneuvering Liman Von Sanders in the same way and in the same tight place where Richard had once outmaneuvered Saladin. With the breach made, ten thousand cavalry were loosed across the Turkish rear, and after that nothing could restore the Jackos' defenses. It was like Armageddon." —from "The Sound of Chariots," spring 2006

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An Interview with Peter Makuck

A frequent contributor answers questions about poetry, trapping, and the generation gap.

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An Interview with Dawn Potter

The Sewanee Review discusses life, learning, and literature with Maine poet, Dawn Potter. Plus: The scoop on her Milton memoir and a place in the House of Frost.

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An Interview with Sam Pickering

We sit down with a long-time reviewer and essayist.

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